A whale of a climate change tale

Column by Mary Stobie
Posted 7/11/17

I am extremely concerned that the earth's climate is changing fast. I can't forget the melting ice caps, even as I sit on the balcony of my cabin on the Carnival Glory Cruise ship at 6 a.m.

My …

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A whale of a climate change tale

Posted

I am extremely concerned that the earth's climate is changing fast. I can't forget the melting ice caps, even as I sit on the balcony of my cabin on the Carnival Glory Cruise ship at 6 a.m.

My cabin is starboard side, as we head north from the Caribbean island of Grand Turk toward Miami, Florida. The ship's speed is 19.1 knots and sea depth is a whopping 16,120 feet. I wonder if the fish down deep sense any climate change in the ocean.

I've never heard innocent fish arguing with each other about political topics or any other topics. "Hey, this water is warmer than last year!" They don't say that, but maybe they feel it.   Meanwhile, they just swim and feed in the blue green depths.

But for me, I do take a political position. I figure cutting industrial emissions and greenhouse gasses will help slow down climate change. In my opinion, the United States, as a world leader, should have stayed in the Paris Climate Accords. As we attempt to prevent nuclear war, we are acting as a protector of nations, communities, and the earth. Why don't we protect the earth in the area of climate change?

Our group on the Carnival Glory includes my son, my daughter and her husband and their two children, my son-in-law's parents, my husband and me. We have not discussed climate change over dinner. We are here to have fun. We have gone swimming on the beaches of St. Thomas, Half Moon Cay and Grand Turk, each with lovely aqua waters. The clarity of the ocean in Half Moon Cay startled me, as clear as a glass table. It was so clear it permitted me to see the ocean floor, and walk out as far as I could, until I was in over my head, treading water. I did this for hours with a smile off my face all day.

Now, toward the end of our cruise, I meditate on my balcony. The breeze is strong and blows my hair. I love the motion of the sea. The clouds glow pink, their layers lit up like a heavenly rose garden floating by with the breeze.

I am enraptured, fascinated and riveted by the view from my balcony. With a false security on board the Carnival Glory, a "great mother ship" life seems good.  But if, when we dock in the port of Miami, the ocean has covered Miami Beach and lapped over the road to our hotel, we will wake up in a hurry.

I will quickly order from Amazon.com the new "climate-change-fin-growing-medication." I will not flounder around and order it for my entire family right away. Our grandchildren had better all grow fins and learn how to swim and breathe underwater.

I'm just kidding you, here, or am I?

Mary Stobie is an author and public speaker. Born in the sign of Scorpio, a water sign, she is happiest when near the sea. Contact her at www.marystobie.com or mry_jeanne@yahoo.com.

Mary Stobie

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