County candidates introduce themselves to the community

Jeffco voters to decide on six county offices up for election

Posted 10/22/18

Not only do Jefferson County voters have a near overwhelming amount of ballot issues to decide on, a number of state seats to fill and a new governor to elect, there are six races specific to the …

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County candidates introduce themselves to the community

Jeffco voters to decide on six county offices up for election

Posted

Not only do Jefferson County voters have a near overwhelming amount of ballot issues to decide on, a number of state seats to fill and a new governor to elect, there are six races specific to the Jefferson County government to vote on. And that’s not counting the sheriff, who is running unopposed.

The six county races are: county commissioner representing District 3, clerk and recorder, coroner, treasurer, assessor and surveyor.

To help voters make informed decisions, the Jeffco League of Women Voters and Jefferson Unitarian Church Community Action Network partnered to put on a couple of recent events. The first one took place on Oct. 13 and about 200 people showed up to learn about the statewide ballot issues.

The second one focused specifically on Jefferson County and its races. It took place on Oct. 16, drawing roughly 100 spectators.

The candidates for coroner, treasurer, assessor and surveyor participated in a meet-and-greet where they were given three minutes to introduce themselves. Not all of the candidates running for these offices were able to attend. In attendance was Democrat Scot Kersgaard, and Republican Brian Cassidy, R, the candidates for assessor; Jerry DiTullio, the Democratic candidate for treasurer; Jeff Shrader, the Republican incumbent who is running unopposed for sheriff; Robert Hennessy, the Republican candidate for surveyor; and Annette Cannon, a Democrat running for coroner.

Also in attendance were Bob Wilson and Brad Evans, candidates running for seats as a Regional Transportation District (RTD) director.

Experience “is what it’s going to take to get our property values under control,” Cassidy said, noting his 25 years of experience in the real estate industry and nearly 14 years doing property appraisal work.

Kersgaard pointed out that his main priorities would be to better the technology and communication in the office.

“We’ll have a great website, e-newsletters and lots of community meetings,” he said. “Other than that, it’s about doing the assessments fairly and accurately.”

County commissioner candidates Democrat Lesley Dahlkemper, and Republican Tina Francone, participated in a forum and answered questions related to affordable housing, budget priorities and mental health services. Francone, the incumbent, had a conflict and she was represented by Cindy Beyer who read her responses.

The candidates for clerk and recorder, incumbent Republican Faye Griffin, and Democrat George Stern, also participated in a Q&A forum.

“I want to serve this county in a bigger way,” Stern said, adding his reason for running is because “local government is more important today” than ever.

Stern said some of his initiatives include running an innovative and modern office “to make sure we’re doing all that we can.”

A couple things he mentioned were providing a 21st Century Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) and updated elections security.

Griffin pointed to her nearly 40 years of experience as a county employee.

“I know the job. I love the job,” Griffin said. “The very first thing on my list is providing a service to the public.”

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