Education tax measure makes November ballot

Initiative 93 would get more school funding from state's top earners

Staff report
Posted 8/9/18

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams announced Aug. 9 that a proposed constitutional amendment that would boost income taxes to raise money for education made the ballot. Initiative 93, also …

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Education tax measure makes November ballot

Initiative 93 would get more school funding from state's top earners

Posted

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams announced Aug. 9 that a proposed constitutional amendment that would boost income taxes to raise money for education made the ballot.

Initiative 93, also known as Great Schools, Thriving Communities or Amendment 73, is the first citizen-initiated ballot measure to make the Nov. 6 general election ballot. It involves a complex formula for raising income taxes among the state's top earners to raise money for education.

Colorado law requires that ballot-measure backers turn in 98,492 valid voter signatures — 5 percent of the total of votes cast for all candidates in the last Secretary of State general election, which was in 2014.

In addition, the voter-approved Amendment 71 in 2016 changed the requirements for proposed constitutional amendments. The education measure must pass with a 55-percent majority rather than a simple majority in November, and supporters were required to collect signatures of 2 percent of registered voters in each of the state's 35 Senate districts.

Amendment 73 would raise $1.6 billion a year in additional, sustainable revenue for Colorado's public schools, bringing them closer to the national average in school funding. Revenue will be deposited in the Quality Public Education Fund, a new, dedicated state education fund that would allocate revenue equitably to every Colorado school district.

Six other initiatives are still under review. The results of the review must be announced by Sept. 5.

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