Kids of all ages enjoy high school's trick-or-treat street

Posted 10/23/17

Golden High School's trick-or-treat street might even be more fun than actual Halloween.

Because rather than only going door-to-door to get candy, said Brad Grissom, a Golden resident and father of three, at the high school, the kids get to …

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Kids of all ages enjoy high school's trick-or-treat street

Posted

Golden High School's trick-or-treat street might even be more fun than actual Halloween.

Because rather than only going door-to-door to get candy, said Brad Grissom, a Golden resident and father of three, at the high school, the kids get to participate in fun, interactive activities in every classroom.

“And,” Grissom added, “the high school students are good with engaging all the kids.”

Golden High School Principal Brian Conroy started the trick-or-treat street at the school in 2004. This year, it took place on Oct. 18. Primary organizers of the event are the school's student council, but most — if not all — of the school's various clubs participate.

High schools are often the center of a community, and this is especially so in Golden, Conroy said.

“The community is so supportive of Golden High School, that we need to give back to the community,” he said.

Plus it's just fun to see all the kids in their costumes, said Lorraine Ramirez, the principal's secretary. “And this provides them with a safe place to come.”

The school's French club had a game in which children dig through a tub of straw to find a Halloween-themed object — fake eyeballs and plastic skeletons and bugs — that could be turned it in for a piece of candy.

“The little kids get really into it,” said Emma Newson, a junior in the French club. Newson has an older brother who is college, so it's not often that she get to play with children, she said, which is one of the reasons she enjoys the event.

“We think it's good for the kids to get to be in the high school and learn about it before they attend here,” said Emma Conroy, a sophomore on the student council. “But it's just fun for the entire community. We love putting it on.”

And the children, according to 10-year-old Cheyenne Johns, enjoy the fun games and all the treats.

“I love to see the high schoolers involved in the community,” said Kate Carney, who brought her children Abby, 5, and Dylan, 3, to the event. “It teaches them that we're all in this together and the importance of giving.”

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