USGS comes to Mines in new partnership

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke visits Golden to sign agreement

Staff report
Posted 10/29/18

Faculty and students at the Colorado School of Mines will now have more opportunities to work alongside career scientists, thanks to a long-term partnership between Mines and the U.S. Geological …

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USGS comes to Mines in new partnership

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke visits Golden to sign agreement

Posted

Faculty and students at the Colorado School of Mines will now have more opportunities to work alongside career scientists, thanks to a long-term partnership between Mines and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke visited Colorado to sign the agreement with Mines President Paul Johnson on Oct. 22. They were joined by Colorado's Sen. Cory Gardner and Rep. Ed Perlmutter, and Thomas Jorden, chairman of Mines' Board of Trustees.

“The expanded USGS presence at Mines will capitalize on our collective expertise to address the availability of mineral and energy resources, environmental challenges and geo-environmental hazards, all of which are of critical importance to national security and the economies of Colorado and the nation,” Johnson said in a press release. “It will also create an incredibly unique educational environment that will produce the leaders we need to tackle future challenges related to exploration and development of resources here on Earth and in space, subsurface infrastructure and sustainable stewardship of the Earth.”

Mines and the USGS already have a 40-year history — the USGS Geologic Hazards Science Center and its National Earthquake Information Center is on Mines campus — and this new partnership will bring an additional 150 USGS scientists and their mineral research labs to Mines. They will be housed in a new state-of-the-art facility, the Subsurface Frontiers Building, on the Mines campus.

“Partnering with Colorado School of Mines, a world-class earth science research institution, and co-locating our scientists and researchers creates incredible opportunities to spur innovation and transformational breakthroughs, while also providing an incredible pool of talent from which to recruit,” Zinke said in a statement.

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