81-acre Coors property to be kept undeveloped

Colorado Open Lands easement ensures Bill Coors vision

Paul Albani-Burgio
palbaniburgio@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 2/21/20

While living at the property he called Eagle Mountain near Mother Cabrini's Shrine, Bill Coors at one point made a friend. “There was a turkey that would come visit him every night and it was …

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81-acre Coors property to be kept undeveloped

Colorado Open Lands easement ensures Bill Coors vision

Posted

While living at the property he called Eagle Mountain near Mother Cabrini's Shrine, Bill Coors at one point made a friend.

“There was a turkey that would come visit him every night and it was really weird because it would come and camp out on his deck and hang out there for hours at a time and look in the window and make sure he was there and peck the window,” Bill's son, Scott Coors, said.

That kind of proximity to wildlife defined the property for Bill, who Scott said considered it his “crown jewel” during the 20-plus years he lived there. Now they will continue to define it after his death thanks to a partnership between Coors' family and Colorado Open Lands that has led to the placing of a conversation easement on 80 acres of the property that will ensure those acres can never be subdivided or otherwise developed.

Scott said that he and his siblings set up the easement with Colorado Open Lands to fulfill the vision that Bill, who died in 2018, had for the property.

“His wishes were that it would be protected in perpetuity he was saying that while he was alive and he asked me and my sisters to help figure that out in the future,” Bill said. “And when we looked into it we decided that the conservation easement was the best way to go.”

The property surrounds Bill's former home, which is located at the top of the mountain at 21509 Cabrini Boulevard. The property and its conservation are significant, Colorado Open Lands Community Conservation Program Manager Ben Lenth said, because it is visible both to travelers east and west on I-70.

“For everybody that visits Colorado and goes skiing this is one of the first climbs up the mountain that they get,” Scott said. “So I think to the extent that we can keep it preserved and in its natural state is a tribute to the state.”

Lenth said the property is a breeding ground for elk and mule deer and a habitat for bears, spotted owls, northern goshawk and, of course, wild turkey. Adding to the significance of the property is its location within Denver's mountain backdrop, which has historically contained few houses but recently seen increasing development.”

“In an area like Jefferson County where the rapid pace of development threatens the remaining open space, it's important to know that this piece of it will always be intact and open,” Colorado Open Lands CEO and President Tony Caligiuri said.

Though the property is now preserved, it is not currently open to the public because Scott and his family are working to sell it.

“We didn't want to presume that a future buyer would want people all over the land on horses and bikes and all over the land did do make sure it would be protected,” Scott said. “Hopefully whoever buys it will want to share it.”

If the new buyer does decide to go that route, Jeffco Open Space has expressed a desire to buy the land and make it available to the buyer as open space. But whatever happens with the sale, Lenth said it is a win for the community that the 80-acres will be kept free of further development.

“The family bears a lot of credit for doing this,” Lenth said. “Any land owner when they are giving up development rights they are giving up real value for the public and for the beauty of the place and the wildlife.”

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