A palace for King of Wings in Wheat Ridge

Amidst the pandemic, the city gets a new spot for wings and more

Paul Albani-Burgio
palbaniburgio@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 7/13/20

Four months into a pandemic might not seem like a great time to open up a new restaurant and bar. But it’s been working out pretty well so far for Eddie Renshaw and Evan Pierce. After five years of …

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A palace for King of Wings in Wheat Ridge

Amidst the pandemic, the city gets a new spot for wings and more

Posted

Four months into a pandemic might not seem like a great time to open up a new restaurant and bar. But it’s been working out pretty well so far for Eddie Renshaw and Evan Pierce.

After five years of running their chicken wing business out of roving food truck and several construction-related delays, the pair opened their new King of Wings restaurant at 7741 West 44th Avenue in Wheat Ridge on June 20. There’s barely been a slow moment since.

“We’ve been cranking literally all day every day,” said Renshaw. “Right now, I’d say the biggest problem I’m running into is people calling in to-go orders and we are not even able to keep up with that because of how busy it’s been.”

Renshaw said he credits the early success to the anticipation that had been building for the restaurant among those who frequented the food truck — which Renshaw said has been set up at the majority of the major breweries around the Denver area at one time or another.

“That’s where we realized wings and beer were a hit and started building the brand,” he said.

Now, instead of going to the breweries, they are bringing those breweries to them by serving up a rotating selection of craft beers out of the new restaurant, which includes a bar that runs the length of the dining room.

The menu has also been expanded from the business’ food truck days to include items like a chicken sandwich, cauliflower bites and a wrap (which can be made vegetarian).

However, King of Wings’ calling card will, of course, remain its buffalo wings, which come slathered in such sauces as Spicy Thai and Tangy Gold.

“The reason why our wings are so special is because we slow cook them, so there’s no frying involved, and we grill them so they’re juicy and fall off the bone and then the skin on the outside is crunchy,” said Renshaw. “And then we make all of our own sauces.”

The menu also includes breaded chicken tenders and several sides, including Cajun Parmesan fries and mozzarella sticks.

The other unique thing about the wings (and everything else on the menu) is where it’s prepared: inside a shipping container attached to the restaurant.

Renshaw said he and Pierce began looking into the possibility of building their kitchen inside a restaurant after learning how expensive it would be to complete a kitchen buildout in the space, which is an old laundromat.

“We did that because it saved us 50-grand basically in terms of kitchen build out,” he said. “And it’s basically triple the size of the food truck.”

While Renshaw said he is thankful for the restaurant’s early success, particularly given the challenges that have befallen the restaurant industry, he said it has presented its own challenges.

“We’re realizing we are going to need a little more kitchen staff and stuff to keep up and not burn out,” he said. “We are here every morning cleaning at 7 a.m., prepping the fryer and making the wings and then we are in the container making wings until 10 p.m. So it’s 15-hour days right now. But it’s everything we wanted.”

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