Agricultural property near North Table Mountain rezoned for 33 homes

Neighbors express mixed feelings about development

Corinne Westeman
cwesteman@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 9/30/22

The Jefferson Board of County Commissioners has approved rezoning a 30-acre parcel in unincorporated Golden to allow up to 33 single-family homes.

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Agricultural property near North Table Mountain rezoned for 33 homes

Neighbors express mixed feelings about development

Posted

The Jefferson Board of County Commissioners has approved rezoning a 30-acre parcel in unincorporated Golden to allow up to 33 single-family homes.

The property at 18002 West 53rd Lane, which is directly north of North Table Mountain, was rezoned from agricultural to planned development. County staff recommended approval, saying it’s compatible with nearby land use.

The next step for the project, called Vista at North Table Mountain, will be the platting process.

During the Sept. 27 commissioners meeting, neighbors expressed mixed feelings about the project. Some were in favor, saying the development will include evacuation routes for nearby residents and emergency access points for first responders.

However, some neighbors were opposed, describing concerns about the dangers of landslides or rockfalls onto the property and impacts to wildlife.

Jeffco planner Fritz Clauson described how there are single-family developments to the north and west of the property and a mix of single-family and agricultural properties to the east.

The property’s northwest section would allow up to 30 single-family homes with a minimum lot size of 7,500 square feet. Meanwhile, the southeast section would allow up to three single-family homes with a minimum lot size of 1 acre.

In this way, Clauson explained, the property would act as a transition between the higher-density areas to the north and west and the lower-density areas to the east.

Clauson noted that the very southern edge of the property is in a geohazard area for potential landslides. Residences cannot be in this geohazard area, but there’s no required setback between the geohazard area boundary and a residence.

As far as traffic goes, Clauson said it’d be incorporated into the existing roadway network.

The developers and property owner described the initial idea to route traffic through an existing neighborhood to the north. However, after receiving feedback from neighbors, they instead are working with a neighboring development to the northeast — Bonvue Ranch — to create a route between 58th Avenue and the property.

Additionally, developers for Bonvue Ranch and Vista at North Table Mountain want a roundabout along 58th Avenue for traffic calming and improved access.

Along with a new park, new trails nearby, and an improved water line, Vista at North Table Mountain also includes an emergency fire access road. This will serve as both an evacuation route for residents and an access point for first responders.

With the rezoning approved, Clauson said the next step will be the preliminary and final plat process, which will subdivide the property. After that, the applicants must apply for all required permits before construction can begin.

The platting process requires a slope stability analysis, staff confirmed.

Several neighbors who spoke listed credentials as engineers and geologists, and expressed concerns about the site. Jeff Schroeder said his homeowners association didn’t oppose the project but felt the density should be lessened.

Neighbor Denise Bohon also asked that 15 acres remain undeveloped to maintain wildlife access between North Table Mountain and lands to the east and north. She believed the project would have irreversible impacts on the park’s wildlife, saying North Table Mountain is almost surrounded by development now.

“This is our last chance to maintain this habitat connectivity for wildlife,” she said.

Several neighbors expressed their support for Vista at North Table Mountain, describing how landowner Charlie Williams has wanted to develop the site for decades. He was simply waiting for the right way to do it, Williams and others described.

They believed the proposed density matched the surrounding areas, and felt 33 homes would be a good use of the property.

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