City may buy MillerCoors building to consoidate city offices

Building could also house cultural organization, provide community space

Posted 4/1/19

Although still in preliminary stages, the city is considering buying a MillerCoors building and property for $12.25 million that could house all municipal operations, as well as serve as a community …

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City may buy MillerCoors building to consoidate city offices

Building could also house cultural organization, provide community space

Posted

Although still in preliminary stages, the city is considering buying a MillerCoors building and property for $12.25 million that could house all municipal operations, as well as serve as a community gathering space.

Currently, Golden's administrative offices are spread across 10th Street in downtown Golden: Planning, public works and engineering operate out of the building at 1445 10th St. near Lions Park. Some of the parks and recreation department staff work at the Golden Community Center, 1470 10th St. City hall, police and city council chambers are located at 911 10th St., and the city manager and communications department are across the street in the annex building.

"We could be more efficient and serve the community better if everything was consolidated,” said Steve Glueck, Golden's community and economic development director.

The building the city is looking at is owned by MillerCoors and used as corporate offices. The brewery let the city know late last year that it wanted to get rid of the building at 311 10th St., Glueck said.

The 7.1-acre property is bordered by Ninth Street, East Street, Vasquez Street and Clear Creek. The building is 160,000 square feet.

A recent space study showed the city will likely only need about half of the new building for its municipal and administrative operations, and therefore would work with various community partners to use the extra space as a public place for Golden community and cultural organizations, Glueck said. This would include the Golden History Museum, for example, currently located next to city hall.

The city council will vote April 11 on whether to move the acquisition forward.

If the deal is approved, a lengthy public input process will take place to determine future uses for the existing city hall and history museum sites.

The Golden Investment Task Force is a group that was appointed by city council members late 2017 to advise city council on potential courses of action regarding appropriate levels of community investment in capital infrastructure and amenities. The group worked throughout 2018 and identified consolidating city offices in a centralized location as a capital need.

However, it would be unlikely that the city could construct a building the size of the MillerCoors building because of the cost associated with it, Glueck said.

Golden City Manager Jason Slowinski signed the contract to buy the building and property on March 19. But, pending the city council vote, a lot of work would still need to be done before the acquisition could be finalized. Some of the due diligence has already begun, Glueck said, which includes a series of inspections, surveys, titling and appraisal. All this could take until mid-July, slating a potential closing mid-August.

It's unlikely that any move-in would happen before next year, Glueck said.

“We envision a vibrant gathering place for the community,” Slowinski said in a news release, “with consolidated city offices as well as room for some of our cultural entities to expand and thrive.”

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