Jeffco election results certified despite GOP canvassers declining to sign off

GOP canvassers request audit to address concerns about Dominion machines

Staff Report
Posted 11/25/20

Jefferson County's 2020 election results were certified on Monday, Nov. 23, despite two Republican members of the county board of canvassers declining to sign in favor of certifying the election. …

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Jeffco election results certified despite GOP canvassers declining to sign off

GOP canvassers request audit to address concerns about Dominion machines

Posted

Jefferson County's 2020 election results were certified on Monday, Nov. 23, despite two Republican members of the county board of canvassers declining to sign in favor of certifying the election.

According to state statute, an election shall be certified with a majority of signatures from that board, which currently consists of two representatives from each of the major parties as well as Jefferson County Clerk and Recorder George Stern.

On Monday, Stern signed in favor of certification along with Democrats Susan Glass and Carl Hamm. However, Republicans Denise Mund and Gerald Arnold declined to sign to certify.

In a press release issued on Nov. 23, Mund, who is the chair of the Jeffco Republican Party, wrote that the party's members were requesting that the county complete a bipartisan audit of the code in the Dominion voting machines it has been using to count votes since 2017 before the election is certified.

“Because all voters deserve transparency and accountability in our elections and because of dramatic statistical differences that exist, the (report) filed today requests a bipartisan audit of the Dominion software code,” Mund wrote in the release.

In the report submitted to the clerk and recorder's office on Monday and signed by two other party leaders, Mund wrote that “there should be greater transparency with the software's coding and the ability of the public to see that software audited.”

“I believe there should be a thorough review to alleviate all concerns,” she continued.

The report went on to outline seven requests by the party. Those requests include “a review of the software code for each election moving forward” and “an audit of voter registration lists to explain why issues such as voters (receiving) duplicate ballots and families [receiving] ballots for children that left the home years ago occurred.”

It also requests audits of the 2018 and 2020 results, using a “significantly sized sample that is larger than what has been done to date.” However, the report noted that Mund is “not alleging any sort of election fraud” and does not believe races would be overturned as a result of the audit.

Stern says election already audited

Stern, however, pointed to the audits of the 2018 and 2020 elections that had already been completed prior to the certification of those respective elections.

“Bipartisan audit boards in all 64 counties in the state have already audited the 2020 and 2018 elections,” Stern said in a statement provided by his office to Colorado Community Media. “That is something Colorado has done statewide in every election since 2017. That audit confirms that humans would have counted the ballots exactly as the machines and their software counted those ballots.”

Kara Rowland, the government and public affairs director for Stern's office, also pointed to a statement posted by former Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams about the state's voting process and use of Dominion machines last week.

In that statement, Williams said Dominion's machines have passed 352 audits since they began being used in 2017.

“So, while I can't speak for the practices of every state (some of whom don't have the procedural protections and audits we do in Colorado), I can state that in Colorado the voting systems we use accurately record the votes of Coloradans -- and we've proved it 807 times,” he wrote.

In a video posted to YouTube last February, Stern outlined the process which he said involve the county pulling “a statistically-significant number of ballots” which are looked at with bipartisan teams “to make sure the results that the machine counted on that ballot are exactly as the humans would've counted.”

However, Mund said Jeffco GOP does not feel that effort represented “a true audit” because the county audited just 193 of the 340,000 ballots that were counted in Jeffco.

Mund also said that her party has found anomalies in the results from both 2018 and 2020 that “we were not sure how to understand.”

“The reason I didn't cite specific anomalies in my report is we wanted the focus to be on the bi-partisan effort to certify election results,” she said. “Our focus is not on there being any intentional fraud or anything like that so we intentionally did not include specific data.”

The county GOP also was sent images by two voters of multiple ballots they received for themselves and had also received calls from people whose homes were sent ballots for kids who had not lived there in years, Mund said.

“I understand there is a legal process to clean up the voter rolls but I think it warrants a review just to make sure that appropriate people are getting ballots,” said Mund.

Mund also stated that while the Jeffco GOP was requesting an audit, it did have a good relationship with the county clerk's office.

“I've been asking questions for the last several weeks about the software and this is the culmination of those conversations in which they have been very transparent and I have literally submitted 35 or 40 questions,” she said.

“There are so many people that are questioning Dominion software and because we have a good working relationship with the county clerk's office I think this is a good time to say let's do this extra step right now to ensure voter confidence,” she added.

While Stern decided to go ahead with certification, Mund said she had not sensed he was shutting the down on conversations about ensuring transparency.

“He has been very open to our conversations in the past and I would assume that will continue whether he overrode our declining to certify or not,” she said.

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