Golden seeking ideas from the community for its newest park

City purchased DeLong Park in December 2017

Posted 9/23/19

Picnic tables, fitness equipment, public art, tetherball. The possibilities are nearly endless for Golden's new park. “We have a blank slate,” said Rod Tarullo, the city's director of parks, …

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Golden seeking ideas from the community for its newest park

City purchased DeLong Park in December 2017

Posted

Picnic tables, fitness equipment, public art, tetherball.

The possibilities are nearly endless for Golden's new park.

“We have a blank slate,” said Rod Tarullo, the city's director of parks, recreation and golf, during a community meeting on Sept. 16. “We want to get your ideas.”

In December 2017, the city of Golden bought the property at 395 23rd St. for the sole purpose of turning it into a neighborhood park.

Now, the city is soliciting ideas to learn what the community would like to see at the new park. There a few things to keep in mind when it comes to designing a park, Tarullo said.

DeLong Park is about an acre in size. This means some large amenities, such as a baseball field for example, may be too big.

Additionally, DeLong Park is not meant to attract crowds like Civic Center Park in downtown Denver, or even Lions Park in Golden. Therefore, although it should have its own unique character, the amenities should not be designed to draw in droves of people from across the metro area.

DeLong Park should serve the community as a neighborhood park that's “inclusive, accessible and welcoming,” Tarullo said.

Named after the former property owners, Virgil and Marguerite DeLong, who have since passed away, the city had been eyeing the property for more than 15 years, said Steve Glueck, the city's community and economic development director, in an interview about the park in November 2017.

Located in the central neighborhoods of Golden, the new DeLong Park is in an area that the city identified as having an unmet park need, meaning there is not a park within an approximate one-mile distance or 10-minute walk of the neighborhoods.

The city had been eyeing the property for about 15 years prior to its opportunity to purchase it, said Steve Glueck, Golden's community and economic development director.

It was purchased for $840,000.

The city has about $250,000 budgeted to spend on DeLong Park, should city council approve the 2020 budget as is, Tarullo said.

There are no dates set yet, but the community will be asked to provide input throughout the entire process. After this initial solicitation for ideas, the next step will be for the city's park planners to come up with two or three concepts for the park. Following that, there will be another community meeting for additional input on those concepts. The park planners will then revise all the feedback and concepts into a single plan. The finalized design will first go to Golden's Parks, Recreation & Museums Advisory Board (PRAM) which will provide a recommendation to city council. City council will have to approve the final design, but if the board members do, construction on the park's amenities could begin.

Craig Middleton, board chair of PRAM, recommends people get involved with the planning for DeLong Park now, while its still in early stages, he said.

Middleton hopes to see DeLong Park as a “true neighborhood park,” he said, “rather than a destination location.”

It should cater to that neighborhood, he added.

However, “there's no preconceived notion of what it should be,” Middleton said. “The ideas and uniqueness for it are unlimited at this point.”

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