Golden Sherpa's school-rebuild project one step closer

Mines students set to travel to Nepal in December

Posted 10/12/15

Colorado School of Mines students are heading to Nepal in late December to help rebuild a school destroyed by the April earthquake — the same school from which a local Sherpa and Golden business owner earned his high school diploma in 1992.

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Golden Sherpa's school-rebuild project one step closer

Mines students set to travel to Nepal in December

Posted

Colorado School of Mines students are heading to Nepal in late December to help rebuild a school destroyed by the April earthquake — the same school from which a local Sherpa and Golden business owner earned his high school diploma in 1992.

The design has been finalized and $400,000 of the estimated $700,000 cost has been promised from different international organizations, said Lhakpa Sherpa, 40, owner of the Sherpa House Restaurant and Culture Center on Washington Avenue.

Fundraising efforts are still underway.

"Those 400 students are the future of that area,” Sherpa said of the students who attend the school in Chaurikharka, Sherpa's hometown village. “It's very important they have the opportunity to continue to study.”

A 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Nepal on April 25, severely damaging much of the small country. One of the 11 districts hit hard was the Khumbu Valley, located near the base of Mount Everest in the Himalayas and home to Chaurikharka.

The Chaurikharka school is the only one in the area and serves children in first through 12th grades. The quake completely destroyed the school.

After the quake, people throughout Golden and Colorado reached out to Sherpa and inquired about ways they could help. Their generosity helped raise $22,000, which built temporary learning structures that allowed Chaurikharka students to return to classes on June 21.

The temporary classrooms made a huge difference, Sherpa said. However, the structures consist only of a large tent that provides shelter for a table and chairs, Sherpa said. So, nstead of focusing on a trail-building project, Sherpa's nonprofit organization Hike for Help will be rebuilding the Chaurikharka school.

From Dec. 26-Jan. 8, 15 Colorado School of Mines students will work hand-in-hand with the local Nepalese people to start constructing the school—a project expected to be completed in two years.

The new school will be earthquake-proof and energy efficient, Sherpa said. Traditional construction materials, such as rocks, clay and wood, will be replaced with concrete, rebar and aluminum.

Schooling in the small villages in Nepal is relatively new, said Sherpa, the first from his village to earn a diploma, and students take education seriously now.

Sherpa, Golden, Colorado, Nepal, earthquake, school rebuild, Christy Steadman

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