Land conservancy group fights for Clear Creek Canyon preservation

Organization has saved more than 10,000 acres, but has at least 6,000 acres to go

Posted 11/4/15

Clear Creek Canyon, located just west of Golden, offers world-class recreation while attracting visitors who support local businesses.

Thousands of Front Range residents and tourists visit the canyon to hike, bike, climb, kayak, raft, soar and …

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Land conservancy group fights for Clear Creek Canyon preservation

Organization has saved more than 10,000 acres, but has at least 6,000 acres to go

Posted

Clear Creek Canyon, located just west of Golden, offers world-class recreation while attracting visitors who support local businesses.

Thousands of Front Range residents and tourists visit the canyon to hike, bike, climb, kayak, raft, soar and fish, said Glenn DeRussy, board member of Clear Creek Land Conservancy.

The land “has become a major recreational destination,” DeRussy said. “And it’s right in Golden’s backyard.”

As such, protection of this asset to Jefferson and Clear Creek counties and the greater Golden area is important, he said.

Did you know?

A group of citizens concerned with land conservation formed Clear Creek Land Conservancy in the late 1980s. Its mission is to protect private land through conservation easements. One way this has been accomplished is by pushing the Jefferson County Open Space program to purchase large blocks of property in Clear Creek Canyon to be designated as parkland.

It helped preserve more than 10,000 acres of canyonland.

Clear Creek Land Conservancy has protected more 10,000 acres in Clear Creek Canyon, which are preserved through four Jeffco open space parks, Denver mountain parks, Clear Creek County open space, Clear Creek Land Conservancy holdings and conservation easements on private land.

It helped get public access to more than 30 miles of trails.

The public has access to more than 30 miles of hiking and biking trails in the Clear Creek Land Conservancy’s area of focus. And more miles of trails are under construction. The Peaks to Plains Trail, a project of Jefferson County, Clear Creek County and Great Outdoors Colorado, will be a public, multi-use path along Clear Creek from the South Platte River to Loveland Pass and beyond.

Preservation tasks are not yet complete.

About 30 years ago, the land in Clear Creek Canyon was threatened by two quarry proposals and an encroaching residential subdivision. At that time, most of the private and public access land was limited to the narrow Beaver Brook Trail easement. Although a good amount of the land has been protected today, at least 6,000 acres of high quality, undeveloped land remain unprotected.

To get involved, or learn more about Clear Creek Land Conservancy and Clear Creek Canyon, visit www.clearcreeklandconservancy.org.

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