Letter to the editor: Smoke in our eyes regarding mask mandates

Posted 9/30/21

Can any, not remember those summer’s smoke-filled days?

How many remember the questioner who asked if the now ubiquitous masks would block inhalation of associated aerosol particles?

How …

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Letter to the editor: Smoke in our eyes regarding mask mandates

Posted
Can any, not remember those summer’s smoke-filled days?
How many remember the questioner who asked if the now ubiquitous masks would block inhalation of associated aerosol particles?
How many remember that the answer came back: ‘NO, the masks would not.’?  
If the common variety masks required for all Jeffco students will not block particles which would subsequently leave a visible residue on a commercial air filter, how could they possibly block a virus which is a hundredth of the size?
Doesn’t that demonstrated futility of masking, demolish correspondent Shawna Fritzler’s (9/23) paean for universal student facial diapers?
Will the legion of do-gooders ever set our children free?
 
Sincerely,
Russell W Haas,
Golden
 
Editor’s note: While Mr. Haas is right that cloth masks in particular do not do much good against blocking smoke, that is largely because smoke particles are 10 to 100 times smaller than respiratory droplets. While COVID-19 is smaller than smoke particles, the virus is primarily spread through droplets. Effectiveness against smoke and COVID-19 vary greatly based on type of mask. This is according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

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