New exhibit immerses Goldenites in city’s history

Called Epic Events, it creates a timeline of Golden stories

Posted 8/15/16

Some of the stories are untold, and others are perhaps forgotten or neglected.

But in about a month, all those stories and more will be told at the Golden History Center as part of the Epic Events exhibit.

“There are so many cool things that …

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New exhibit immerses Goldenites in city’s history

Called Epic Events, it creates a timeline of Golden stories

Posted

Some of the stories are untold, and others are perhaps forgotten or neglected.

But in about a month, all those stories and more will be told at the Golden History Center as part of the Epic Events exhibit.

“There are so many cool things that have happened in this community,” said the Golden History Museums' curator Mark Dodge. “Every artifact will tie into a key event in Golden's history.”

Epic Events is expected to open on Sept. 18. It is being referred to as a “timeline experience,” and will span Golden history from 1858 — the gold rush era — to about 2013.

The exhibit will be a permanent fixture of the museum, but staff will always be adding more dates and rotating artifacts. At any given time, at least three dozen artifacts will be displayed, and more than 40 events highlighted. And probably 80 percent of the artifacts have never been seen by the public before, Dodge said.

Working on new exhibits is exciting, said Bryan Bardwell, a Golden resident who subcontracts with most of the Denver-area museums. For Epic Events, Bardwell is helping out with mounting objects.

The way an artifact is mounted is important, he said, because it helps the viewer understand — and be attracted to — the story of the object.

And “there's a lot of different ways to mount objects,” Bardwell said. “It just depends on how the curator and staff want to tell the story.”

People ask about a timeline of Golden history all the time, said the Golden History Museums' director Nathan Richie, so the exhibit will fill a need in the community. It will give new visitors and tourists an opportunity to be immersed in Golden's history, while locals will get a new and different experience each time they visit because of the changing out of artifacts, Richie said.

“The cool part about this museum,” said curatorial assistant Kayla Gau, “is that there is wide variety of types of artifacts.”

Gau added that she has been having a lot of fun working on the Epic Events exhibit. Museum visitors will see a diverse assortment of Golden artifacts, she said. A cast of a T-Rex tooth, a 1950's uranium detector and a postcard from 1906 are some of Gau's favorite artifacts so far.

There will be a lot of ground covered with Epic Events, Dodge said.

“The stories are amazing for such a small town,” he said. And, he added, “we're always uncovering something new.”

Golden History Museum, Golden, gold rush era, timeline, epic events

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