New subdivision moving forward at C-470 and Quincy

286 homes to be built at C-470 and 285

Paul Albani-Burgio
palbaniburgio@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 9/22/21

A plan to build 286 homes near the interchange of C-470 and Highway 285 is moving forward after the Jefferson County commissioners approved a plat for the site on Sept. 14. Last month, the …

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New subdivision moving forward at C-470 and Quincy

286 homes to be built at C-470 and 285

Posted

A plan to build 286 homes near the interchange of C-470 and Highway 285 is moving forward after the Jefferson County commissioners approved a plat for the site on Sept. 14.

Last month, the commissioners unanimously voted to rezone a 37.4-acre property located just to the west of West Quincy Avenue and Turkey Creek Road on which developer Remington Homes was proposing to construct the development, which it is calling the Three Hills subdivision.

That vote came after a multi-hour hearing in which several residents raised concerns about issues ranging from the proposed development’s impact on the wildlife that inhabit the area to a perceived lack of infrastructure to serve the development to water and light pollution.

However, perhaps the biggest issues related to the overall increase in population and density the development would bring to the area and the additional vehicles it would generate in an area where traffic is already a significant concern.

In explaining her decision to vote in favor of the rezoning, Commissioner Lesley Dahlkemper said she appreciated that the development would have less of an impact than what could be built on the property under its previous zoning classification, which allowed for a mix of commercial, agricultural and residential uses, including up to 300 units of housing.

All three of the commissioners praised the developers for listening to and trying to address the concerns raised by residents.

“What I really appreciate is really listening to the concerns that people have, going through them point by point and looking at the things that you are able to address,” said Commissioner Tracy Kraft-Tharp of the developers.

The commissioners also said that while they understood the concerns about traffic, they felt that existing Colorado Department of Transportation plans to install roundabouts at the interchange of C-470 and Quincy will help to alleviate current traffic problems, even with the additional traffic the development would generate.

That traffic is also projected to be less than the amount that could be generated by the maximum uses allowed under the existing zoning.

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