Residents donate thousands despite canceled Summer Jam fundraiser

Concert is now set to return in 2021

Jessica Gibbs
jgibbs@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 8/3/20

Last year, John Saunders and Bill Clarke watched 2,400 people pile into the amphitheater at Philip S. Miller Park in Castle Rock for the annual concert they cofounded, Castle Rock Summer Jam. After …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2019-2020, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Residents donate thousands despite canceled Summer Jam fundraiser

Concert is now set to return in 2021

Posted

Last year, John Saunders and Bill Clarke watched 2,400 people pile into the amphitheater at Philip S. Miller Park in Castle Rock for the annual concert they cofounded, Castle Rock Summer Jam.

After headliners The Fray wrapped up, Saunders and Clarke handed a $10,000 check raised through ticket proceeds and business sponsorships to The Foundation for Douglas County Schools. The men raise funds for a local cause each year through the concert.

This year went differently. John's daughter, Katie, and Bill's daughter, Katelyn, helped fundraise $10,000 despite COVID-19 canceling the 2020 Summer Jam concert. Elle King was supposed to headline.

On July 30, the 15-year-olds handed a check to Dan Marlow, executive director of the Douglas/Elbert Task Force's Help & Hope Center, on the amphitheater stage in front of empty seats. Katie said she wanted to ensure something positive came out of” the canceled event.

To Marlow, that's more important than ever. Demand for rent and utility assistance from the center has spiked approximately 30%, he said. Eviction moratoriums lifted. Stimulus funds waned. People are still losing jobs, he said.

The center also had to double its food bank budget in April, May and into June. The Help & Hope Center gets supplies through a food rescue program and would typically receive one to two pallets of food a day from grocery stores clearing out shelves.

For months, Marlow said, the pandemic's blow to supply chains meant grocery stores no longer had those pallets of food to give the center. Supplies are more available now, he said, but demand for food assistance is still up slightly.

Marlow is not sure how long demand will stay high, but he expected “it to be crazy” through the end of 2020.

“It's hard to predict anything in this environment,” he said.

Saunders and Clarke said they waited until the last possible minute to cancel this year's show, which would have been the fourth annual Summer Jam. Once Red Rocks Amphitheatre canceled shows into August, they knew it was time to cancel their show as well.

Saunders and Clarke said they hope it will inspire other fundraisers canceled by COVID to continue raising support for the community.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.