Super-food trucks swing by King-Murphy

First graders learn about entrepreneurship, helping others

Deb Hurley Brobst
dbrobst@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 12/21/21

King-Murphy’s first graders have proved they are chefs, entrepreneurs and philanthropists as part of a fun unit on, of all things, economics.

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Super-food trucks swing by King-Murphy

First graders learn about entrepreneurship, helping others

Posted

King-Murphy’s first graders have proved they are chefs, entrepreneurs and philanthropists as part of a fun unit on, of all things, economics.

They created food trucks of sorts, sold goods to students and staff, then used the proceeds from sales to purchase Christmas gifts for children on the school’s giving tree. In a very hands-on way, the students learned about buying and selling, counting money and understanding owning a business.

Students kept some of the profits to defray the cost of making the goods, and they took the net proceeds — about $500 — to the Evergreen Walmart to buy gifts for infants, children and teenagers.

The entire project was a win for the first graders, a win for students and staff who bought items at the food trucks and a win for the families whose children will receive gifts for Christmas.

Teacher Kristen Betts decided to try something different to get the youngsters to understand economics concepts, and the food-truck project was born. The students decorated the food trucks made out of boxes, decided what they wanted to sell, and then sold cookies, soups, candies and more to everyone in the school. Everything cost $1, and students do the math to provide change.

First grader Lydia Didier with the help of her dad, Chris, sold a chicken soup that Lydia called really yummy. Chris said he liked the hands-on way the first graders were learning about money, and buying and selling items. He also hoped there was some soup left after the food-truck sales were over.

First grader Victoria Van Volkinburg made “The Best Sugar Cookies” with her mom, and she was thrilled with the number of customers who came to her food truck.

Beck’s Best Bakery, operated by first grader Beck Dunbar, sold a sweet treat made of Rollo candy, pretzels and M&Ms. Beck said he made them to sell because they’re one of his favorites. He explained that the $1 price was good because you wouldn’t want to charge $93 since no one would buy the items the food trucks were selling.

Jordan Dunbar, Beck’s mom, said Beck talked about the project for weeks, so excited about what he was learning and doing. She was amazed that students as young as first graders understood the concepts of buying and selling, profit and loss.

Nora Brough said she sold out of her mini pies really fast, while Cam Marinas said his soup, which was something most students had not tried before, was a bit more difficult to sell.

Lily Bourassa said she got a lot of practice counting money, and Corwin Lauritsen said the dollar bills filled up his entire basket.

First graders Abigail Lloyd, Wyatt Butler and Kendrick Crawford also took part in the food truck challenge.

At the Dec. 7 shopping excursion to Walmart, students said they originally wanted to buy for themselves but then realized they were buying gifts for others, especially those in need. Jett Hinshaw selected something for a teen boy, which Grace Eichhorst purchased clothes.

They agreed that it made them feel good to help other children.

Andrew Wolff, the district’s student futures navigator, called the food truck unit a great way to get kids up and moving, building something and being involved in learning. Plus parents got involved by helping the students make food to sell.

“As educators, we are truly challenged to tap a part of (students’) minds and creativity,” Wolff said. “We aspire to do that in our classrooms.”

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