Surviving the election as we look for the good in 2020

Column by Michael Alcorn
Posted 11/12/20

Whew. It would appear — and I hope I’m not saying this prematurely — that we have survived what I thought *for sure* was going to be November’s contribution to the dreck of 2020. That is, we …

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Surviving the election as we look for the good in 2020

Posted

Whew. It would appear — and I hope I’m not saying this prematurely — that we have survived what I thought *for sure* was going to be November’s contribution to the dreck of 2020. That is, we seem to have survived the election. I know many (71 million) are very disappointed in the outcome at the top of the ticket; hopefully, they are taking some solace in what happened down the ticket. And, at any rate, they aren’t out burning down cities.

So we got that going for us.

And, weirdly, almost against all expectations for this year, that asteroid managed to miss us the day before the election.

Now, we can all turn our attention to some of the great traditions of the season, like the slow dwindling of the candy bowl just in time to eat enough food to feed a herd of bison, and settling in to watch one of the great Shakespearean adventure/holiday movies… Die Hard.

In between, I think it’s good to take some stock, as we may have a few weeks of peace and quiet, to consider everything that’s happened this year. And, yeah — not everything this year has been horrible.

Hats off to families! I say this after a weekend spent painting a third room in our house since March. There are still two rooms on the docket, and I’ve also built a flower garden in the yard at the wife’s behest. One of the underreported stories of the year has got to be the amount of home improvements that people have accomplished, and, as man married for almost 26 years, I can tell you that, short of real crises, nothing taxes a marriage more than working on home improvement projects together. Something about the inevitable conflicts that arise between management and labor…

And I think we all know who management is.

At any rate,congratulations to all those families who have accomplished wonderful things around their houses without throwing heavy objects at each other.

Last week brought to light again just how hard the schools are working to keep providing instruction for the students. I had several schools in my area of influence who were putting together a staff with chewing gum and duct tape, who were isolating classrooms and small groups, and whose administrators were holding court via Zoom just to keep the doors open. For many teachers and staff, it has gone way past “above and beyond” — some of the stuff I’m seeing is downright heroic.

And, just so you know I’m not just being a P.R. hack for the schools, I would like to point out that the teacher’s union is currently circulating a petition calling on the schools to shut down. Not that it’s their call, or that the petition is going to, likely, influence much. It’s just a bad look for the union when their members are doing seriously heavy lifting, all the while knowing that a school shutdown is starting to look inevitable.

Speaking of the election, don’t we look genius here in Colorado? We’ve been doing the whole mail-in ballot thing for years now, and we were actually done with our homework Tuesday night. Meanwhile, Nevada is looking like the deadbeat brother-in-law reaching for the check at dinner. Bet if there was a casino bond issue on the ballot they’d have finished counting by now.

You want my vote next election? Create a system to shut down calls about the extended warranty. Yes, that will make me better off than four years ago.

And last, apparently, on the night of the Winter Solstice (Dec. 21), Jupiter and Saturn are going to be in conjunction in the night sky, while a waxing quarter moon trails them by just a tad. And it seems that Betelgeuse is nowhere close to going supernova — it’s just “pulsing.” So maybe the end of the year is looking up!

Michael Alcorn is a teacher and writer who lives in Arvada with his wife and three children. His new novel, “Charon’s Blade,” is available at Amazon.com, on Kindle, or through MichaelJAlcorn.com.” His opinions are not necessarily those of Colorado Community Media.

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