Local

Taking action against insect emerald ash borer

City wraps up treatments on local Ash

Posted 6/22/14

The city has finished their treatments of ash trees for the season in preparation of a possible spread of the emerald ash borer, an invasive insect native to Asia.

Sinche May 1 the city treated 250 public ash trees including another 75 which were …

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Local

Taking action against insect emerald ash borer

City wraps up treatments on local Ash

Posted

The city has finished their treatments of ash trees for the season in preparation of a possible spread of the emerald ash borer, an invasive insect native to Asia.
Since May 1 the city treated 250 public ash trees including another 75 which were tended by maintenance at the Colorado School of Mines campus.
Golden has approximately 15,000 ash trees, 10 percent of them public, according to Dave High, city forester with the city of Golden.
Since its appearance in Boulder in September 2013, the emerald ash borer has caught the attention of officials, scientists and arborists alike who are helping to spread the word about the potential danger the emerald ash borer has on Ash trees.
“Once an exotic pest comes in and it doesn’t have the natural controls like it does in its native environment, they run kind of wild, there’s not much that slows them down or stops them,” said Derek Fox, district manager and certified arborist for the Davey Tree Expert Company.
Already, the EAB has killed millions of Ash trees in the U.S., Fox said.
The Colorado Department of Agriculture estimates that ash found in the urban forest accounts for 15 percent of the tree canopy.
“The larva of the insect is what does the most damage,” Fox explained. “When the larva feed they feed just under the bark of the tree,” he said. “Basically, what that does is it girdles the tree just under the bark and essentially shuts down the tree’s vascular system.”
Once the larva has grown to adult beetles they emerge in the spring leaving behind a “D” shaped exit hole.
It can take three to five years before noticing the decline and death of the tree which means the EAB can feed for that long before being noticed.
But it isn’t all doom and gloom for Ash trees or for the homeowners who may have one on their property.
Experts recommend the best defense against the destructive EAB is preventive measures like the ones the city of Golden is undertaking. Tree care companies, like Davey Tree Expert Company, provides treatment services for landowners with Ash, as well as sampling services for curious tree owners who wonder if their Ash have already been affected.
In the meantime, The Colorado Department of Agriculture has quarantined Boulder County and the entire town of Erie’s firewood, chips, mulch and other wood-like scraps and lumber in an effort to contain the EAB from spreading, the state department of agriculture reported.
“If another year goes by and we don’t see the emerald ash borer in the City of Golden we may have to rethink our recommendations,” said Dave High, city forestry manager.
There are many resources for anyone interested in protecting or finding out more about their ash tree.
More information about the EAB can be found online at eabcolorado.com.

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