Ten year sentence for Jeffco road rage

Lakewood PD nabs suspect within an hour of first emergency call

Bob Wooley
bwooley@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 2/2/21

A Jeffco man was sentenced to 10 years behind bars for attempted murder stemming from two road rage incidents on Dec. 21, 2018.  Blaine Evans, 33, accused of opening fire on at least two vehicles …

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Ten year sentence for Jeffco road rage

Lakewood PD nabs suspect within an hour of first emergency call

Posted

A Jeffco man was sentenced to 10 years behind bars for attempted murder stemming from two road rage incidents on Dec. 21, 2018. 

Blaine Evans, 33, accused of opening fire on at least two vehicles while driving on or around 6th Avenue in Lakewood, entered into a plea deal requiring mandatory incarceration with sentencing guidelines calling for a prison term of between 8 and 24 years. 

This case has received virtually no media coverage of the events or subsequent plea deal. Documents related to the case, were initially not available to the public due to protected status. The Jeffco Transcript requested those court case documents, and an explanation for the protected status. According to Jeffco Assistant District Attorney, Amanda Gall, the records had been given protected status for reasons unknown to her. The arrest affidavit has now been unrestricted. 

During the Jan. 27 sentencing hearing, one of the victims, Brent Hanlin, gave an emotional account of his encounter with Evans. 

Hanlin said Evans had come from behind him at a high rate of speed as he drove eastbound on 6th Avenue in the left lane. He said he immediately pulled into the lane to his right in an attempt to allow Evans to pass, but Evans had veered to the right lane at the same time. Hanlin said Evans then swerved into the far right lane, accelerated to catch up to him and gestured toward him with his middle finger. He said Evans then slowed his vehicle and crossed behind him, going from the slow lane, across two lanes of traffic, to the fast lane eventually ending up beside him again. Hanlin said he tried to ignore Evans.

“Not wanting to incite this guy, I did not look over at first,” he said. “But after a couple of moments, I did look to my left and had just a split second to see the defendant pointing a handgun at me through the passenger window that he had rolled down. Before my brain could even process the situation, I heard the gun fire and the simultaneous noise of the bullet ricocheting off it, and shattering my windshield.”

Hanlin said Evans then accelerated away at a very high rate of speed.

In the next part of his statement, Hanlin became emotional. His voice shook and he began to cry as he spoke of the fear the incident had caused and what might have become of his family’s future if he’d been injured or killed. He said after the incident he understood what Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was and how it feels.

Evans’ first victim that day, Ryan Oller, did not speak at the hearing. However, information from the arrest affidavit states Oller had honked at Evans for an unsafe lane change, after which Evans, driving in the left lane, slowed down, forcing Oller who was in the center lane, to drive past him. Oller stated that as he passed Evans’ white Dodge Ram, he could see Evans pointing a shotgun at him through the passenger window. Oller said he abruptly slowed down to get out of the line of fire. Evans continued driving and Oller lost sight of him. Oller then exited at Sheridan Boulevard and was preparing to make a right hand turn when he noticed Evans waiting at the light, preparing to turn left. When Oller made his right hand turn, he heard what he thought was a shotgun blast, ducked down and drove to a nearby parking lot to call 911.

In statements to Lakewood Detectives after his arrest, Evans denied shooting his shotgun, but admitted to shooting at a small silver Honda-like vehicle. That would indicate a third victim since neither Oller nor Hanlin was driving a silver vehicle. The possible third victim was never located.

Several character witnesses including Evans’ father and fiancé spoke on his behalf during the sentencing hearing.   

The defense also called Dr. Karen Fukutaki, who claimed Evans suffered from language processing difficulties due to concussions he had suffered earlier in his life as one possible explanation for his reckless behavior.

A report filed by Lakewood Detective, Danny Simpson, said that when Evans was arrested, officers noted his vehicle smelled like gun powder and there was a spent shotgun shell in the vehicle. He had two weapons, a shotgun and a revolver. Every casing in the revolver was spent. Also found in the vehicle were an open bottle of whiskey, marijuana, a sword, a small empty whiskey bottle and unloaded shotgun shells.

As she handed down the 10-year sentence, Judge Lily Oeffler said Evans was lucky his actions hadn’t killed someone. He will be credited time for the 119 days he spent behind bars. For the remainder of the time between his arrest and sentencing, Evans had been free, continuing to work and drive. 

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