There’s only 7.53 billion types of people in the world

Column by John Akal
Posted 1/22/20

There are two kinds of people in this world … How many times have you heard someone about to give you a lecture, or their sage advice, begin the conversation with those words? The two kinds of …

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There’s only 7.53 billion types of people in the world

Posted

There are two kinds of people in this world … How many times have you heard someone about to give you a lecture, or their sage advice, begin the conversation with those words? The two kinds of people generally just refers to ones who agree with them and the ones that don’t. I mean, seriously, you can apply that statement to just about anything under the sun. People who like Winter vs. Summer, coffee vs. tea, watching vs. participating, left vs. right, land vs. sea, the list is endless. The truth is everyone is unique and has a totally mixed bag of preferences for many different things. When you start looking closely at everyone, there actually more than seven billion kinds of people in this world.

This all came to mind when I was thinking of a clever way to start this week’s column. I was going to say that there are two kinds of people, those who like the wilderness and those who prefer sidewalks and pavement. But then I started thinking about those who like the forest vs. the prairie, the wetlands vs. the desert, the mountains vs. the ocean and came to the conclusion that within any of those groups you’re still going to have a divide between those who like tacos vs. pizza. Yeah, there’s a lot of different kinds of people in this world.

But if you are someone who does like the great outdoors, you will probably enjoy what’s coming up here in Golden at the end of the month. There’s a little something for both kinds of people, or all 7 billion.

It’s the 15th Annual Winter Wildlands Alliance Backcountry Film Festival presented by the Colorado Mountain Club at the American Mountaineering Center. Wow, that’s a pretty impressive, and lengthy title for an event, huh?

Well, before you get all excited and start planning on how you are going to get out of work for an entire week to catch all the movies, I’ll let you know that this is a short film festival. Short in both how long each movie is, and short in how long the whole thing runs. It’s just happening on Thursday evening, Jan. 30.

Yes, it’s kind of a mini film festival but it does feature 10 award winning short films that look at adventure, environment and climate, youth outdoors and the ski culture. The Winter Wildlands Alliance is a national nonprofit organization that partners with groups like Colorado Mountain Club at the local level to inspire and educate the backcountry community to protect and care for their winter landscapes. They bring this show to several locations around the country. Money raised at each screening stays in the local community to support human-powered recreation and conservation efforts, winter education plus avalanche safety programs as well as raising awareness of other winter management issues. They like to make it a gathering place for the back country snow sports community.

The 10 films being shown are: “Can’t Ski Vegas” by Joey Schusler, Ben Page, and Thomas Woodson, “Drawn to High Places” by Nikki Frumkin and Outdoor Research, “Endless Winter: Chapter One” by Nikolai Schirmer, “Khutrao” by Agreste Chile, “Leave Nice” Tracks by Dan Cirenza, Marius Becker, and Kyle Crichton, “A Climb for Equality” by Rylo and Caroline Gleich, “Colter: A Legacy of Adventure” by Sawyer Thomas and Rils Wilbrecht, “Backflippers” by Luigi Dellarole, “Climate Change in the Kennels” (Film makers not listed) and “Peak Obsession” by Cody Townsend and Bjarne Salen. There will be an intermission in the middle of the whole thing too.

Showtime is 7 p.m. with the doors opening at 6:30. It’s supposed to be over by 9 p.m. so that will give you an idea of how long each of the films are going to be. This would be a good family night as the kids probably won’t get bored with short films instead of lengthy documentaries.

Tickets run $15 but Colorado Mountain Club Members can get them for $12. You can order them in advance by going to the CMC website at www.cmc.org and clicking on the events calendar. You can also call the office at (303) 279-3080. The American Mountaineering Center is at 710 10th St. in Golden.

John Akal is a well-known jazz artist/drummer and leader of the 20-piece Ultraphonic Jazz Orchestra. He also is president of John Akal Imaging, professional commercial photography and multi-media production. He can be reached at jaimaging@aol.com

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