avenue flashes

Trust me when I tell you about this new play

Column by John Akal
Posted 5/22/19

Last week I talked about travelin’ down a road and flirtin’ with disaster. Those were the words to a song that played a key roll in the subject I was writing about. This week, I’m going to …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.
avenue flashes

Trust me when I tell you about this new play

Posted

Last week I talked about travelin’ down a road and flirtin’ with disaster. Those were the words to a song that played a key roll in the subject I was writing about. This week, I’m going to actually address traveling down a real road and truly flirting with a disaster, or two or three. Well, actually hundreds of potential disasters.

Or not.

I don’t know. Maybe they’re real.

We live in an era where the term “fake news” has become a huge topic of debate and conversation. You hear it from every place that can generate a sound and read about it in almost everything in print. It’s gone from a clearly defined concept of deliberate misinformation propaganda to misguided rhetoric from uninformed sources spreading an unsubstantiated rumors to super market tabloids publishing ridiculous stories about being abducted by Bigfoot. For a long time, even though these things existed, it was pretty easy to eventually sort the truth from fiction.

But now we live in an age where there are so many different ways that news is created and distributed and so many sources that question everything that’s reported and it’s validity. We hear the term “fake news” bantered about like it’s some kind of normal situation, and it’s causing people to question anything they didn’t see with their own two eyes.

Now, that being said, pretty much every legitimate news source, including our own Golden Transcript here, have addressed this situation with editorials and defended the ethics of the press in one way or another, and I’m not writing about this subject with that concept in mind. Actually, I’m using this as an introduction to something that looks like it’s going to be pretty entertaining.

There is one group of people that have grown in number over the last few decades and that have contributed quite a bit to the concept that “fake news” exists and that it is deliberately put forth to cover up something that someone doesn’t want you to know about. They have become collectively known as Conspiracy Theorists. These are the folks that come up with all kinds of ideas, some crazy, others not so much, of government cover-ups of things like Marilyn Monroe being murdered, alien spaceships housed in Area 51, and at this point, hundreds of other theories that they seem to have built some kind of case to prove are true. They hit the news every so often, and sometimes are very convincing. I’m not going to pass any kind of judgment here. For all I know the people living across the street from me could be from another planet. They drive an electric car and wear socks with sandals.

Well, our own Miners Alley Playhouse here in Golden is presenting a new play called Queen of Conspiracy that deals with that subject. They have commissioned award-winning playwright Josh Hartwell to write the interesting, untold, and true story of Mae Brussell and the people of the 1960’s and 70’s when she lived.

She was a conspiracy theorist and radio host, who started by telling the world that JFK’s assassination may not have been perpetrated by a lone gunman and was a mass conspiracy. But after Watergate in 1972, she actually started to figure out what was going on before anyone else did. She had quite a following.

It’s a witty and humorous portrayal for which Hartwell is known. He adapted their unique version of A Christmas Carol, which they presented last season. But this is a brand new play making its debut at Miners Alley Playhouse. Although Queen of Conspiracy is the untold story about America’s first modern-day conspiracy theorist, it’s presented with a twist that brings it into what that means in today’s charged politics.

Queen of Conspiracy will be running Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday afternoons at 2 p.m. through June 23. Ticket prices vary by the day of the week, so check their website at www.minersalley.com or give them a call at the box office at (303) 935-3044. They are located at 1224 Washington Avenue, here in Golden. If this is a hit, they can start working on a sequel. Art Bell, the King.

John Akal is a well-known jazz artist/drummer and leader of the 20-piece Ultraphonic Jazz Orchestra. He also is president of John Akal Imaging, professional commercial photography and multi-media production. He can be reached at jaimaging@aol.com

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.